Face coverings are highly recommended for those up to date on vaccinations and required for those not up to date on vaccinations
in indoor spaces on campus and in university owned or operated venues.  


Staff/Faculty may request a face covering from EH&S. Students may request a face covering from The Well.
Breadcrumb

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

UC Riverside uses the Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT) to identify and communicate hazards present in the laboratory or research area. Once hazards are identified, laboratory members must review and acknowledge the laboratory hazard assessment, complete a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) training module via LHAT, and print a voucher to be exchanged for PPE.

For questions or comments, please email us at ehslaboratory@ucr.edu or call (951) 827-5528. 

Obtaining PPE

1. Request your Principal Investigator (PI) to add you to their laboratory's hazard assessment roster. (Note: If you are not a PI, do not select "Begin a Laboratory Hazard Assessment").

2. Review your PI's Laboratory Hazard Assessment by selecting laboratory hazard assessment under "Action List." 

3. Acknowledge your PI's listed laboratory hazards.

4. Complete the PPE training module via the laboratory hazard assessment (not UC Learning Center).

5. Only when Steps 1-4 are complete, schedule a PPE fitting appointment. Please bring your PPE voucher and photo ID to your scheduled appointment at the EH&S office (395 West Linden Street). 

The University of California is committed to providing a healthy and safe working environment for all members of the campus community. This Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) policy is designed to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses for all academic appointees, staff, students, and visitors.

Minimum Attire and PPE when working with, or adjacent to, hazardous material use areas within a Laboratories/Technical Areas:

  • Full length pants (or equivalent) and closed toe/heel shoe attire
  • Laboratory coats (or equivalent protective garments)
  • Protective eyewear
  • Protective gloves

View the Full University of California, Personal Protective Equipment Policy

Laundering

  1. Request pick up of your lab coat for laundering.
  2. Drop off laundering at the Campus Business Services - Receiving/Loading Dock located in the Corporation Yard.

Corporation Yard  (map)
3401 Watkins Dr., Riverside CA 92507
Located in the southwest corner of Corporate Building B (shared with Facilities Services).
Open 8am - 5pm, Monday – Friday
Phone: (951) 827-5542

 

Laboratory Coat Selection and Use
Guidance Document

Download the full document

 

A.    PURPOSE

Lab coats ensure that your personal clothing and body are protected against contaminants and potential workplace accidents. Always wear your lab coat in the workplace to avoid tracking contaminants home and prevent bodily harm. Never underestimate the potential for laboratory hazards, regardless of how safe the workplace activities may seem.

All University of California, Riverside (UCR) students, faculty, staff, and affiliates (collectively, “UCR personnel”) are required to wear lab coats when:

  • (i)    Working with hazardous materials, including but not limited to, infectious materials, radioactive materials, chemicals, physical hazards (e.g., potential for flying objects/debris), and harmful temperature extremes; and, 
  • (ii)  Working within a Laboratory/Technical Area, defined by the University of California – Office of the President (UCOP) PPE Policy as “a location where the use or storage of hazardous materials occurs or where equipment may present a physical or chemical hazard”. The use of lab coats should be appropriately selected on the basis of the present hazard(s). 

The Laboratory Coat Selection and Use Guidance Document (the “Guidance Document”) is intended to provide instructions and information on determining when lab coats are required, lab coat considerations and limitations, selecting appropriate lab coat based on present hazards, and care, use, and disposal. 
 

B.    DETERMINING WHEN LAB COATS ARE REQUIRED 

The Principal Investigator (PI)/Supervisor is required to assess hazards in the laboratory or research setting using the UCR Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT). The LHAT’s objectives are to determine if PPE is necessary and provide UCR personnel with guidance to select the appropriate PPE, including lab coats. The LHAT is UCR’s primary and recommended workplace hazard assessment process. 

In addition to the LHAT, UCR personnel must also be aware of the present workplace hazards. As detailed in Section A of the Guidance Document, lab coats must be worn when working with hazardous materials or occupying a Laboratory/Technical Area; examples of these criteria requiring lab coats include: 

Examples of Laboratory/Technical Areas
Examples of Workplace Hazards/Associated Activities 
Research Settings/Laboratories   Chemicals (solids/liquids/vapors/mists/sprays)
Teaching Settings/Laboratories  Biological Agents (blood/bacteria/viruses/fungi)
QA/QC and Analytical Laboratories  Dusts/Particles/Chips/Sand/Dirt
Stock/Storage Rooms   Torching/Welding/Soldering/Molten Metals/Sparks
Waste Accumulation Areas/Locations Abrasive Blasting/Machining
Cold Rooms  Light Radiation (bright lights, ultraviolet, laser, welding)
Machine Shops/Workshops  Chopping/Chipping/Cutting/Drilling/Grinding
 Vivaria   Hammering/Milling/Sanding/Sawing
 Visual/Performing Arts Studios and Shops  Temperature Extremes (liquid nitrogen, sparks)

If lab coats are required, follow the instructions outlined on the UCR Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) webpage to obtain either flame resistant or traditional lab coats at no charge. UCR EH&S will ensure that the issued lab coats are properly fitted to the individual and replace any damaged lab coats. Specialized lab coats (e.g., barrier lab coats, chemical-resistant aprons) must be provided by the workplace’s PI/Supervisor.
 

C.    LAB COAT CONSIDERATIONS AND LIMITATIONS

No single lab coat is protective against all hazards – different types of lab coats provide different types of protection: 

traditional white lab coat
Traditional lab coats are intended to protect against incidental splashes of hazardous materials. 
blue flame resistant lab coat

Flame resistant lab coats are intended to protect the user when there is a risk of catching personal garments or skin on fire; flame resistant – not fire-proof.  

Must be worn when (i) working with any amount of pyrophoric materials, (ii) working with flammable liquids near potential ignition sources, or (iii) determined by the LHAT. 

pin stripe white barrier lab coat

Barrier lab coats (pinstriped) are intended to protect the user when there is a risk of splash from blood-borne pathogens or other biohazardous materials.

no shorts

  

no sandals icon

Shorts or open-toed shoes must never be worn in a Laboratory/Technical Area or when working with or near hazardous materials, even under a lab coat. Full-length pants (or equivalent) and closed-toe/heel shoes must be worn for safety and compliance with the UCOP PPE Policy.


 
      

When wearing lab coats, ensure that the coats are fully buttoned/snapped to their full length.   Lab coat sleeves must be of a sufficient length to prevent direct skin exposure while wearing gloves.
lab coat buttons
person in lab coat with exposed skin
 
D.    SELECTING APPROPRIATE LAB COAT BASED ON PRESENT HAZARDS 

The below table, extracted from the University of California – Office of the President (UCOP) PPE Policy summarizes the appropriate PPE (including lab coats) to be worn based on the UCR workplace activity. Reference your LHAT for specific information on your workplace’s present hazard(s) and recommended PPE. 

 

Chemical Hazards
 
Activity in a Lab
Potential Hazard Recommended Lab Coat Type  Additional PPE
Flame Resistant 
(NFPAA 2112)
Traditional Barrier
C01. Working with small volumes of corrosive (e.g. acids, caustics, etc.) liquids or solids. Eye or skin damage. Low probability for a splash hazard.   X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C02. Working with corrosive or acutely toxic liquids or other materials which creates a splash hazard. Poisoning, increased potential for eye and skin damage.   X  
  • Chemical-resistant apron
  • Safety goggles
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C03. Working with small volumes of flammable solvents/materials when no reasonable ignition sources are present. Skin or eye damage, potential poisoning through skin contact.   X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C04. Working with flammable materials (including solvents): When using a large quantity; or, any quantity when there is a risk of ignition; or, areas where flammable vapors or gas are may be present. Major Fire. Major skin or eye damage, potential poisoning through skin contact. X    
  • Safety glasses
  • Flame-Resistant (FR) outer gloves
  • Chemical-resistant inner gloves
C05. Working with toxic or
hazardous chemicals (solid, liquid, or
gas). (including but not limited to
GHS H301, H302, H311, H312,
H331 H332)
 
Skin or eye damage, potential poisoning through skin contact.   X  
  • Safety glasses (chemical splash goggles for large quantities)
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C06. Working with Acutely Toxic
Chemicals. (GHS H300, H310, H330)
 
Spills, splashes, ingestion, inhalation, absorption. Chemicals pose a high level of immediate health risk.   X  
  • Chemical protection apron
  • Safety glasses
  • Chemical resistant gloves
C07. Working with an apparatus with contents under pressure or vacuum. Eye or skin damage.   X  
  • Chemical-resistant apron (for high risk activities)
  • Safety glasses
  • Face shield (for high risk activities)
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C08. Working with pyrophoric (air reactive) chemicals or chemicals that in contact with water releases flammable gasses (water reactive). 
(GHS H25x and H26x)
 
Severe skin and eye damage. 
Fire. 
 
X    
  • Safety glasses 
  • Face shield 
  • FR rated outer gloves 
  • Chemical-resistant inner gloves  
C09. Working with potentially explosive chemicals. (e.g. Nitrates, Perchlorates, Azides, Nitrites etc.)  Splash, detonation, flying debris, skin and eye damage, fire.  X    
  • Safety glasses 
  • Face shield, and/or use blast shield 
  • Chemical-resistant gloves 
C10. Minor chemical spill cleanup  Skin or eye damage, respiratory damage.    X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
  • Shoe covers
  • Chemical-resistant apron
C11. Major chemical spill cleanup  Multiple hazards.  Call EH&S for assistance 
C12. Working with known or suspect human carcinogens (GHS H350, H351)  Spills, splashes, ingestion, inhalation, absorption. High hazard cancer-causing agents.    X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C13. Working with reproductive hazards (GHS H340, H341, H360, H361)  Spills, splashes, ingestion, inhalation, absorption. Agents that affect reproductive capabilities, cause mutation and adversely affect fetal development.    X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
C14. Working with engineered nanomaterials.  Inhalation, exposure, dermal exposure.    X  
  • Chemical Splash goggles 
  • Chemical-resistant gloves
Physical Hazards
Activity in Lab Potential Hazard Recommended Lab Coat Type  Additional PPE
Flame Resistant
(NFPA 2112)
Traditional Barrier
P01. Working with cryogenic liquids.  Major skin, tissue, or eye damage.    X  
  • Safety glasses (goggles for large volumes) 
  • Face shield  
  • Cryogenic protective gloves 
P02. Removing freezer vials from liquid nitrogen.  Vials may explode upon rapid warming. Cuts to face/neck and frostbite to hands.    X  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Face shield  
  • Cryogenic protective gloves 
P03. Working with very cold equipment or dry ice.  Frostbite, hypothermia.    X  
  • Safety glasses 
  • Cryogenic protective gloves 
P04. Working with scalding liquids or hot equipment (e.g. autoclave, water bath, oil bath).  Burns resulting in skin or eye damage.    X  
  • Safety glasses (goggles for large volumes) 
  • Thermal protective gloves (impermeable insulated gloves for liquids and steam) 
P05. Glassware washing.  Lacerations, chemical splash.    X  
  • Safety glasses 
  • Heavy rubber gloves  
P06. Working with loud equipment, noises, sounds, alarms, etc.  Potential ear damage and hearing loss.  Earplugs or ear muffs as necessary
P07. Working with a centrifuge.  Imbalanced rotor can lead to broken vials, cuts, exposure.       
  • Safety glasses  
  • Disposable gloves 
P08. Working with a sonicator.  Ear damage, exposure.    X  
  • Safety glasses 
  • Disposable gloves 
  • Earplugs or ear muffs as necessary 
P09. Working with sharps (e.g. 
needles and razor blades.) 
Cuts, exposure.    X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Cut resistance gloves

 

Biological Hazards

 *I have a BUA that addresses all of these items. Skip to next section.

Activity in lab Potential Hazard Recommended Lab Coat Type  Additional PPE
Flame Resistant
(NFPA 2112)
Traditional Barrier
B01. Working with human or nonhuman primate blood, body fluids, tissues, cells or other potentially infectious material (OPIM) which may contain human blood borne pathogens (BBP).  Exposure to infectious materials and sharps injuries.    

X

(Disposable)

  • Eye and mucous membrane protection (as appropriate for operations)  
  • Disposable gloves 
B02. Working with microbial agents (bacteria, virus, parasites, yeast, fungi, prions), recombinant DNA and/ or biological materials (cells, tissues, fluids) exposed to or likely to contain Risk Group 1 microbial agents or recombinant DNA. (BSL-1)  Eye irritation, sharps injury. Exposure of infectious material to those who may have personal health issues which make them more susceptible to infection; cross contamination of animal or extra laboratory areas. 
 
  X  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Disposable gloves 
B03. Working with microbial agents, recombinant DNA and/or biological materials (cells, tissues, fluids) exposed to or likely to contain Risk Group 2 microbial agents or recombinant DNA. (BSL-2)  Exposure to infectious material, particularly through broken skin or mucous membranes, sharps injuries.    X  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Double layer of disposable gloves 
B04. Working microbial agents, recombinant DNA and/or biological materials (cells, tissues, fluids) exposed to or likely to contain Risk Group 2 microbial agents or recombinant DNA for which Biosafety Level 3 practices are required. (BSL-2+)  Exposure to infectious materials with high risk of exposure by contact with skin or mucous membranes and/ other potential or unknown routs of entry and or increased consequences of exposure. Sharps injuries.    X  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Double layer disposable gloves  
B05. Working with microbial agents, recombinant DNA and/or biological materials (cells, tissues, fluids) exposed to or likely to contain Risk Group 3 microbial agents or recombinant DNA. (BSL-3)  Exposure to infectious materials with high risk of exposure, particularly through the inhalation route.  Full back closing disposable gown or coveralls (preferred)  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Double layer disposable gloves
  • Shoe cover or dedicated shoe 
  • Full back closing disposable gown or coveralls (preferred)  
B06. Working with live animals- alone or in conjunction with Risk Group 1 microbial agents or recombinant DNA. (ASBL-1)  Animal bites, allergies, eye irritation, sharps injury. Exposure of infectious material to those who may have personal health issues which make them more susceptible to infection; cross contamination of animal or extra laboratory areas. 
 
  X  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Disposable gloves 

Additional PPE (e.g. puncture resistant gloves) may be required based on risk assessment by the IBC & IACUC.  Additional gowning (shoe covers, face mask) may be required for animal welfare purposes.  
 

B07. Working infected or potentially infectious live animals—alone or in conjunction with Risk Group 2 microbial agents or recombinant DNA (or materials exposed to RG-2 agents). (ABSL-2)   Animal bites, exposure to infectious material, allergies, sharps injury.    X  
  • Safety glasses  
  • Disposable gloves 
  • Bouffant 

Additional PPE (e.g. puncture resistant gloves) may be required based on risk assessment by the IBC & IACUC.  Additional gowning (shoe covers, face mask) may be required for animal welfare purposes.
 

 

Non-Ionizing Radiation Hazards
Activity in lab Potential Hazard Recommended Lab Coat Type  Additional PPE
Flame Resistant
(NFPA 2112)
Traditional Barrier
N01. Working with ultraviolet radiation.   Conjunctivitis, corneal damage, skin redness.    X  
  • UV face-shield with correct OD value 
  • Opaque gloves 
N02. Working with infrared emitting equipment (e.g. glass blowing).   Cataracts, burns to cornea.    X  
  • Appropriate shaded glasses

 

Radiological Hazards

* I have a RUA and/or MUA that addresses all these. Skip to next section. 

Activity in lab Potential Hazard Recommended Lab Coat Type  Additional PPE
Flame Resistant
(NFPA 2112)
Traditional Barrier
R01. Working with unsealed radioactive materials including generally licensed radioactive material or devices (e.g., uranyl acetate, uranyl nitrate, thorium, nitrate).  Cell damage, potential spread of radioactive materials.    X  
  • Safety glasses
  • Impermeable gloves or chemical resistant gloves
R02. Working with unsealed radioactive materials in hazardous chemicals (corrosives, flammables, liquids, powders, etc.).  Cell damage or spread of contamination plus hazards for the specific chemical.    X  
  • Safety glasses (goggles for splash hazard) 
  • Chemical-resistant gloves  
R03. Working with radioactive sealed sources or devices containing sources of radioactive materials (e.g., liquid scintillation counters, gas chromatographs/electron capture detectors, static eliminators, etc.)  If sealed source is compromised due to removal from equipment or physical abuse: cell damage, potential spread of radioactive materials.  PPE is not necessary under normal operating instructions.   
 
Note:  Source may not be removed form device except by EH&S or manufacturer.  

 

Laser Hazards
Activity in lab Potential Hazard Recommended Lab Coat Type  Additional PPE
Flame Resistant
(NFPA 2112)
Traditional Barrier
L01. Open Beam- Performing alignment, trouble-shooting or maintenance that requires working with an open beam and/or defeating the interlock (s) on any Class 3 or Class 4 laser system.   Eye damage  Consider appropriate skin-covering clothing (e.g., tightly-woven fabrics). For Class 4 lasers, flame-retardant clothing is recommended 
  •  Appropriate protective eyewear, wavelength and optical density based on individual beam parameters.
L02. Open Beam- Viewing a Class 3R laser beam with magnifying optics.  Eye damage  N/A N/A N/A
  • Appropriate protective eyewear, wavelength and optical density based on individual beam parameters.
L03. Open Beam- Working with a 
Class 3B laser open beam system with the potential for producing direct or specular reflections. 
 
Eye damage N/A N/A N/A
  • Appropriate protective eyewear, wavelength and optical density based on individual beam parameters.
L04. Open Beam- Working with a Class 4 laser open beam system with the potential for producing direct, specular or diffuse reflections.  Eye damage, skin damage  Appropriate skin protection  
  • Appropriate protective eyewear, wavelength and optical density based on individual beam parameters.
L05. Non-Beam - Handling dye laser materials, such as powdered dyes, chemicals, and solvents.  Cancer, explosion, fire.  X    
  • Gloves
  • Safety glasses
L06. Non-Beam- Maintaining and repairing power sources for large Class 3B and Class 4 laser.  Electrocution, explosion fire  X    
  • Electrical isolation mat
L07. Enclosed Beam- Using a Class 
1 device housing a Class 3B or Class 4 enclosed or embedded laser with the potential for beam exposure during a Service Event. 
Eye damage, skin damage  Appropriate skin protection 
  • Appropriate protective eyewear, wave length and optical density based on individual beam parameters


E.    CARE, USE, AND DISPOSAL
Lab coats should never be taken outside of the laboratory or research setting, as contaminants can be tracked to public settings or private residences. Additionally, lab coats should only be laundered at specialized facilities, i.e., lab coats should not be washed in standard residential or commercial laundry machines. Visit the UCR Lab Coat Laundering webpage for lab coat laundering instructions. 

UCR personnel are responsible for periodically inspecting their PPE (including lab coats) for any damage that may compromise the PPE’s protective integrity. The PI/Supervisor should be informed of damaged PPE. UCR EH&S will replace damaged or heavily soiled lab coats at no charge. To replace damaged or heavily soiled lab coats, follow the instructions outlined on the UCR EH&S PPE webpage

The PI/Supervisor is responsible for the proper disposal of damaged and heavily-soiled lab coats. Any protective clothing that becomes contaminated with hazardous materials must be decontaminated or appropriately discarded based on the contamination category (e.g., biological, chemical). For good-condition lab coats that are no longer used, contact ehslaboratory@ucr.edu for EH&S drop-off instructions. 
 

Protective Glove Selection and Use
Guidance Document

Download the Full Document

A.    PURPOSE
All University of California, Riverside (UCR) students, faculty, staff, and affiliates (collectively, “UCR personnel”) are required to use protective gloves, when handling infectious materials, radioactive materials, chemicals, and harmful temperature extremes; or when performing other inherently hazardous activities. The protective gloves should be appropriately selected on the basis of the present hazard(s). 

The Protective Glove Selection and Use Guidance Document (the “Guidance Document”) is intended to provide instructions and information on performing a hazard assessment to determine if protective gloves are necessary, appropriate selection of protective gloves, donning/doffing and disposal of protective gloves, allergy information, and limitations of protective gloves. 
 

B.    HAZARD ASSESSMENT

The Principal Investigator (PI)/Supervisor is required to assess hazards in the laboratory or research setting using the UCR Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT). The LHAT’s objectives are to determine if protective gloves are necessary, provide UCR personnel with guidance to select the appropriate gloves, and training in the use of protective gloves among other personal protective equipment (PPE). In addition to considering the protective gloves recommended by the LHAT, UCR personnel must carefully review and understand (i) the considerations/limitations associated with protective gloves and (ii) proper procedures for donning/doffing protective gloves, as outlined in Sections D and E of this Guidance Document.

The LHAT is UCR’s primary and recommended workplace hazard assessment process. However, in the event that the LHAT cannot be completed or is inapplicable, such as when potential hazards are present outside of a typical workplace setting (i.e., laboratory, research environment), the PI/Supervisor is responsible for the hazard assessment process. The PI/Supervisor should then complete a Job Hazard Analysis form for submittal to the UCR Industrial Hygiene (IH) Department via ehsih@ucr.edu.  
 

C.    RECEIVING PROTECTIVE GLOVES

Based on the inputted workplace hazards, the LHAT will recommend protective glove(s) to be used, if necessary. The PI/Supervisor should provide UCR personnel with the protective gloves recommended in the LHAT. 

If the LHAT recommends the use of fire-resistant protective gloves (e.g., due to the handling of pyrophoric materials), the UCR Environmental Health & Safety department (EH&S) will issue fire-resistant gloves. In the LHAT, UCR personnel must first “acknowledge” the workplace hazards outlined by the LHAT and complete an online training module. After which, an appointment can be scheduled via the UCR PPE Request webpage to receive the fire-resistant gloves; please print and bring a copy of the PPE voucher (issued via the LHAT website) to the scheduled PPE appointment. 

D.    GLOVE CONSIDERATIONS AND LIMITATIONS 
Different types of gloves provide different types of protection. No single protective glove is protective against all potentially present hazards (e.g., chemical, fire), and no protective glove is completely impermeable. Depending on the hazardous substances present in the workplace, a combination of protective gloves may provide the necessary protection. 

To ascertain which protective glove material is most suitable for a particular hazardous exposure, always refer to the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) of the chemicals present in the workplace environment, the protective glove manufacturer, and consult the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommendations for Chemical Protective Clothing Database. A general non-exhaustive glove selection guidance table is presented in Section G of this Guidance Document. When selecting the appropriate protective glove, consider the following factors: 

  • Chemical type
  • Temperature extremes
  • Equipment used (e.g., sharps, piercing objects)
  • pH
  • Toxicity
  • Duration of contact

Additionally, the following protective glove characteristics, techniques, and equipment should be considered: 

  • Double gloving – A second set of protective gloves may be worn over the initial set of protective gloves to provide an additional layer of protection. If the outer set of protective gloves becomes damaged or contaminated, the inner set of gloves will continue to provide protection until the outer set of protective gloves is replaced. The physical characteristics (e.g., swelling, cracking) of the outer set of gloves should be closely monitored; if signs of damage or contamination are observed, promptly dispose of and replace the outer set protective glove. The combination of double gloves used should not significantly hinder the UCR personnel’s dexterity, which may ultimately result in the unsafe handling of hazardous materials.
  • Sleeve length – At a minimum, the worn protective gloves should cover the wrists. Ensure that the protective gloves overlap the cuffs of the laboratory coat or overalls, and that the sleeve lengths of the worn protective gloves are appropriate for the present workplace hazards. 
  • Glove boxes – A glove box is a sealed container, equipped with protective gloves, used to manipulate hazardous materials with minimal exposure. Glove boxes generally provide adequate protection from highly-hazardous substances. The following general considerations should be understood prior to the operation of a glove box; always consult the glove box’s operating manual prior to the use of a glove box. 
    • The glove box should first be inspected for damage or leaks; a glove box should never be operated if the glove box’s protective gloves are suspected of damage (e.g., pinholes, tears) or if there is indication of a leak in the glove box. Promptly notify your PI/Supervisor if a glove box is suspected of damage or a leak. 
    • Nitrile gloves should be donned prior to operation of the glove box, which will act as a base protection layer. The base pair of nitrile gloves will also keep the glove box’s protective gloves clean from sweat, which may degrade the protective glove material (e.g., rubber). 
    • Use of sharps in the glove box should be minimized. If the use of sharps in the glove box is necessary, extreme caution should be exercised. Additionally, the glove box’s protective gloves should be operated slowly and carefully; abrupt movements or “pumping” of the glove box’s protective gloves may result in a pressure differential which may present safety concerns. 

The condition and effectiveness of the protective gloves in use should be closely monitored. Generally, protective glove effectiveness is measured in the below-listed characteristics. If any observable changes are noted in the protective gloves’ physical characteristics (e.g., swelling, cracking), promptly dispose of and replace the protective gloves. Disposable gloves should never be reused. 

  • Degradation — A change in a glove’s physical characteristics (e.g., swelling, softening, cracking, tears, change in color or texture).
  • Permeation rate — The speed at which a hazardous substance penetrates the glove material.
  • Breakthrough time — The time between initial contact and first detection of the hazardous substance inside the glove.

E.    PROTECTIVE GLOVE DONNING, DOFFING, AND DISPOSAL  
The terms donning and doffing refer to the practice of dressing (donning) and undressing (doffing) PPE. It is critical that PPE, including protective gloves, is properly donned/doffed to avoid direct contact with contaminants (i.e., transmission, exposure) and subsequent contamination of non-workplace surfaces (e.g., dining areas). The following instructions outline safe practices in donning/doffing protective gloves. 
 
Donning Protective Gloves –

  • Prior to use, inspect the appropriately-selected protective gloves for holes, punctures, tears, cracking, and discoloration. If any observable changes are noted in the protective glove’s physical characteristics (e.g., swelling, cracking), promptly dispose of and replace the protective glove. Protective gloves that have been used for an extended period of time may be at higher risk of degradation. 
  • Prior to donning the protective gloves, ensure that the protective gloves are of proper size for the UCR personnel. Improperly sized gloves (e.g., too small or large) may result in tears or dexterity issues which could compromise safety. 
  • Hands should be thoroughly washed prior to donning protective gloves. In an uncontaminated work area, insert five fingers into the cuff of the first protective glove, and pull the cuff over the wrist; repeat this process with the second protective glove. For disposable gloves (e.g., nitrile, latex), ensure a secure fit around the palms and wrists; the cuffs should fit snuggly around the wrists. 

 

Doffing Disposable Protective Gloves – 

  • Prior to doffing protective gloves, it should be understood that disposable gloves should never be washed or reused.
  • Disposable protective gloves should be doffed prior to exiting the workplace; it is critical that contaminated protective gloves are not worn or doffed outside the immediate workplace. UCR personnel must be prudent in avoiding protective glove contact with public/non-workplace-related surfaces such as office/mobile phones, door handles, and public drinking fountains.  
  • Following hazardous workplace activities, the dominant hand should be used to pinch the outer surface of the non-dominant hand’s cuff, and carefully pull off the non-dominant hand’s protective gloves. The removed protective glove should then be balled by the worn protective glove. After which, two fingers should be slipped beneath the gloved hand and carefully peeled off the hand until it is inside out. The below images depict the aforementioned disposable protective glove doffing process. Throughout the doffing process, the UCR personnel must be mindful not to touch the bare skin of the hand or wrist with the outer surface of the contaminated protective gloves. The doffed protective gloves can then be disposed.
how to doff gloves

Doffing Reusable Protective Gloves – 

  • Protective gloves should be doffed prior to exiting the workplace; it is critical that contaminated protective gloves are not worn or doffed outside the immediate workplace. UCR personnel must be prudent in avoiding protective glove contact with public/non-workplace-related surfaces such as office/mobile phones, door handles, and public drinking fountains.  
  • If authorized based on the handled chemicals, rinse and wash the exterior surface of the reusable protective gloves. Carefully loosen both protective gloves by slightly pulling on the glove fingertips. The protective gloves should be handled by the cuffs and placed in a designated storage area (e.g., drying rack), located away from chemical(s) and uncontaminated areas. The protective glove storage area should be assumed to be contaminated. Throughout the doffing process, the UCR personnel must be mindful not to touch the bare skin of the hand or wrist with the outer surface of the contaminated protective gloves.   

Proper Disposal of Protective Gloves – 

If the protective gloves are not contaminated with any hazardous substances, they may be disposed of in the general trash. However, if the waste protective gloves are suspected to be contaminated by radioactive, chemical, or biohazardous substances, they should be handled and disposed of in accordance with appropriate hazardous waste management requirements, as outlined by UCR’s Hazardous Waste Management webpage and the UCR Laboratory Waste Disposal Requirements Guide

F.    ALLERGY INFORMATION 
Use of natural rubber or latex protective gloves may result in allergic reactions such as irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and general latex allergic reactions. 
 

Mild symptoms may include:

•    itchiness 
•    dryness 
•    irritation 
•    rashes
•    blisters
 

More-severe symptoms may include: 

•    sneezing 
•    runny nose 
•    itchy/watery eyes 
•    scratchy throat 
•    difficulty breathing 
•    wheezing 
•    coughing 
 

The most-severe reaction to natural rubber or latex protective gloves is anaphylaxis, an acute allergic reaction which is potentially life-threatening. UCR personnel should be aware of these potential allergic reactions prior to the use of natural rubber or latex protective gloves. If the above-listed symptoms are observed, the natural rubber or latex protective gloves should be promptly doffed and the PI/Supervisor notified. 

G.    PROTECTIVE GLOVE COMPARISON TABLE  
The following protective glove comparison table is intended to provide general guidance for selecting protective gloves; the information provided in the protective glove comparison table is not exhaustive of all potential hazards associated with hazardous substances encountered in the workplace. The information contained within this table should be referenced in combination with the protective glove recommendations provided by the LHAT, and the protective glove considerations and limitations outlined in Section D of this Guidance Document. Manufacturer databases or websites, such as the Cole Palmer Safety Glove Chemical Compatibility Database, may also be referenced to determine which protective gloves are effective against a certain hazardous substance. 
 

Protective Glove Material Intended Use Advantages Disadvantages Sample Photograph

Latex (natural rubber)*

*Note: Hypoallergenic gloves, glove liners, and powderless gloves may provide the necessary protection for those with allergies to natural rubber and latex. 
 

Incidental contact
  • Effective against biological and water-based materials
  • Ineffective against organic solvents
  • Minimal chemical protection
  • Difficult to detect puncture holes
  • May cause or trigger latex allergies (see Section F of this Guidance Document) 
latex gloves
Nitrile

Incidental contact

Extended contact
 

  • Excellent general use glove
  • Protective against solvents, oils, greases, and some acids/bases
  • Clear indication of tears and breaks
  • Alternative for individuals with latex allergies
  • Generally not recommended for use with strong oxidizing agents, aromatic solvents, ketones and acetates
nitrile gloves
Butyl rubber Extended contact
  • Protective against wide variety of chemicals
  • Effective against ketones and esters
  • Ineffective against gasoline and aliphatic, aromatic, and halogenated hydrocarbons
butyl rubber gloves
Neoprene Extended contact
  • Protective against acids, bases, alcohols, fuels, peroxides, hydrocarbons, and phenols
  • Protective against most hazardous chemicals
  • Ineffective against halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons
neoprene gloves

Norfoil (Silver Shield)*

*Note: Dexterity can be partially regained by using a heavier weight Nitrile glove over the Norfoil/Silver Shield glove 

Extended contact
  • Protective against most hazardous chemicals.
  • Poor fit/limited dexterity 
norfoil gloves
Viton Extended contact
  • Protective against chlorinated and aromatic solvents
  • Resistant to cuts and abrasions
  • Ineffective against ketones
  • Expensive
viton glove
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) Specific use
  • Protective against acids, bases, oils, fats, peroxides, and amines
  • Resistant to abrasions
  • Ineffective against most organic solvents
Polyvinyl chloride glove
Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) Specific use
  • Protective against aromatic and chlorinated solvents
  • Ineffective against water-based solutions
PVA gloves

Stainless steel, Kevlar, leather*

*Note: If there is potential for biological or chemical contamination, wear appropriate disposable gloves over the cut-resistant gloves and discard after use

Specific use
  • Cut-resistant gloves 
  • Sleeves are available to provide protection to wrists and forearms
---
stainless steel, kevlar and leather gloves

Cryogenic resistant material, leather*

*Note: Never dip gloves directly into liquid nitrogen

Specific use
  • Protective against cryogenic materials
  • Designed to prevent frostbite 
---
cryogenic gloves

 

Safety Eyewear Selection and Use
Guidance Document

Download the Full Document

A.    PURPOSE

Safety eyewear is essential in preventing eye injuries, such as chemical splash or blunt impact, and should always be worn in the workplace where these hazards may be present. Never underestimate the potential for eye injury, regardless of how safe the workplace activities may seem. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, approximately 20,000 eye injuries occur in the workplace each year – a vast majority of these eye injuries can be prevented with use of the appropriate safety eyewear. 

All University of California, Riverside (UCR) students, faculty, staff, and affiliates (collectively, “UCR personnel”) are required to wear safety eyewear when:
(i)    Working with hazardous materials, including but not limited to, infectious materials, radioactive materials, chemicals, physical hazards (e.g., potential for flying objects/debris), harmful temperature extremes, light radiation (e.g., ultraviolet light, lasers); and, 

(ii)    Working within a Laboratory/Technical Area, defined by the University of California – Office of the President (UCOP) PPE Policy as “a location where the use or storage of hazardous materials occurs or where equipment may present a physical or chemical hazard”. The use of safety eyewear should be appropriately selected on the basis of the present hazard(s). 

The Safety Eyewear Selection and Use Guidance Document (the “Guidance Document”) is intended to provide instructions and information on determining when safety eyewear is required, safety eyewear considerations and limitations, using only American National Standards Institute (ANSI)-certified safety eyewear, selecting appropriate safety eyewear based on present hazards, care and use, and first aid for eye injuries. 
 

B.    DETERMINING WHEN SAFETY EYEWEAR IS REQUIRED 

The Principal Investigator (PI)/Supervisor is required to assess hazards in the laboratory or research setting using the UCR Laboratory Hazard Assessment Tool (LHAT). The LHAT’s objectives are to determine if safety eyewear is necessary and provide UCR personnel with guidance to select the appropriate safety eyewear. The LHAT is UCR’s primary and recommended workplace hazard assessment process. 

In addition to the LHAT, UCR personnel must also be aware of the present workplace hazards. As detailed in Section A of the Guidance Document, safety eyewear must be worn when working with hazardous materials or occupying a Laboratory/Technical Area; examples of these criteria requiring safety eyewear include: 
 

Examples of Laboratory/Technical Areas

•    Research Settings/Laboratories
•    Teaching Settings/Laboratories
•    QA/QC and Analytical Laboratories
•    Stock/Storage Rooms
•    Waste Accumulation Areas/Locations
•    Cold Rooms
•    Machine Shops/Workshops
•    Vivaria
•    Visual/Performing Arts Studios and Shops

Examples of Workplace Hazards/Associated Activities 

•    Chemicals (solids/liquids/vapors/mists/sprays)
•    Biological Agents (blood/bacteria/viruses/fungi)
•    Dusts/Particles/Chips/Sand/Dirt
•    Torching/Welding/Soldering/Molten Metals/Sparks
•    Abrasive Blasting/Machining
•    Light Radiation (bright lights, ultraviolet, laser, welding)
•   Chopping/Chipping/Cutting/Drilling/Grinding
•    Hammering/Milling/Sanding/Sawing
•    Temperature Extremes (liquid nitrogen, sparks)

If safety eyewear is required, follow the instructions outlined on the UCR Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) webpage to obtain safety glasses and goggles at no charge. UCR EH&S will ensure that the issued safety eyewear is properly fitted to the individual and replace any damaged safety eyewear. Specialized safety eyewear (e.g., welding helmet, laser/UV safety glasses) must be provided by the workplace’s PI/Supervisor.   

C.    SAFETY EYEWEAR CONSIDERATIONS AND LIMITATIONS 

Different types of eyewear provide different types of protection: 

impact resistant glasses
Impact Resistant Safety Glasses are intended to protect the user's eyes when working with materials that may fly towards the user's face, impacting the eyes. 
splash goggles
Splash Goggles are intended to protect the user’s eyes against the risk of hazardous materials in a non-solid phase, such as liquids, sprays, and splashes. Additionally, safety goggles may be worn to reduce eye exposure to nuisance dusts. 
face sheild
Face Shields may be worn as secondary eye and face protection over safety eyewear. Note that face shields may not be worn as a substitute for safety eyewear, i.e., safety goggles or glasses must be worn underneath a face shield.
prescription eyeglasses
Prescription Eyeglasses are *not* suitable eye protection and should never be used as a substitute for safety eyewear. Reference Section D of the Guidance Document for additional information. EH&S offers standard safety glasses and goggles, including styles designed to fit over prescription eyeglasses.

D.    USING ONLY ANSI-CERTIFIED SAFETY EYEWEAR

Only use safety eyewear that has been ANSI-certified. Safety eyewear marked with “Z87” or “Z87+” have been tested and certified by ANSI to withstand impact. Notably, “Z87+” certified safety eyewear meets a higher impact standard and goes through more testing than “Z87” certified safety eyewear. For workplaces with high-risk of eye damage, contact EH&S for recommendations. 

z87 stamp

 

It is important to note that prescription eyeglasses do *not* provide suitable eye protection, unless the prescription eyeglasses have been specifically manufactured for eye protection and are ANSI-certified. Prior to donning safety eyewear, inspect the frame or lenses for a “Z87” or “Z87+” marking before use. 

When wearing safety goggles, ensure a snug seal between the face and goggles. 

snug seal around goggles

When wearing safety glasses, ensure minimal gaps between the glasses and eyes in all directions.

minimal gaps around eye glasses

E.    SELECTING APPROPRIATE SAFETY EYEWEAR BASED ON PRESENT HAZARDS 
Present 
Hazard 
Minimum Safety Eyewear Required 
(properly fitted and ANSI certified)
Additional PPE Considerations
Flying Objects or Debris  Safety glasses with side protection or goggles Side protectors or face shield may be used to supplement the minimum safety eyewear required.  
Heat 
(sparks, molten splash, high temperature)
Safety goggles and a face shield Consider protection against optical radiation (e.g., reflective or screened face shield). See below radiation-related activities.
Cryogenic materials or liquids Safety goggles and a face shield Consider additional cryogenic-resistant PPE (e.g., cryogenic gloves).
Chemical splashes, droplets, sprays; irritating mists  Safety goggles Face shield may be used to supplement the minimum safety eyewear required.
Nuisance and Fine Dusts Safety goggles Consider frequent cleaning and closing goggle vents when possible. 
Various Types of Welding Welding helmet over safety glasses or goggles. The welding helmet must be equipped with the appropriate filter lens for the present optical radiation hazard(s), such as ultraviolet/infrared radiation or glare.  Additional welding safety controls and PPE should be implemented. Consider Hot Work Program eligibility.
Infrared Radiation Infrared safety glasses with side protection or infrared goggles, rated to protect against the specific wavelength present Face shield or welding helmet may be worn over the minimum safety eyewear, as required.
Bright Lights/Glare Safety glasses with side protection or safety goggles, rated to protect against the brightness of present light Face shield or welding helmet may be worn over the minimum safety eyewear, as required.  
Lasers Laser safety glasses with side protection, rated to protection against the specific wavelength present Additional laser safety controls and PPE should be implemented.  
Ultraviolet Light Ultraviolet safety glasses with side protection or ultraviolet goggles, rated to protect against the specific wavelength present Face shield or welding helmet may be worn over the minimum safety eyewear, as required.   

 


F.    CARE AND USE

Prior to wearing any PPE, including safety eyewear, the user should first inspect the PPE for any signs of damage, such as scratches or cracks. If the safety eyewear is found to be damaged, UCR EH&S will then replace the safety eyewear (see Section B). Damaged safety eyewear may reduce the user’s ability to see and break upon impact. Safety eyewear should be cleaned with water and lens-safe tissues. Ensure proper storage to prevent unnecessary wear and tear. 
 

G.    FIRST AID FOR EYE INJURIES
Eye Injury First Aid Procedures
Chemical Exposure
  • If contact lenses are worn, immediately remove from them from the eyes.
  • Flush the affected eye(s) with water for at least 15 minutes.
  • Seek immediate medical attention and describe the chemical exposure to the medical professional.
Blunt Impact
  • Apply a cold compress without putting pressure on the eye(s).
  • If there is bruising, bleeding, change in vision, or pain is experienced when the eye moves, immediately seek medical attention.
Foreign Particle in Eye
  • Do not rub the eye(s) and attempt to blink repeatedly.
  • Flush the eye(s) with water for 15 minutes if the particle is hazardous (e.g., chemical, biological). For non-hazardous particles, flush eye(s) with water until removed.
  • If the particle can be seen, an attempt may be made to remove the particle using a clean washcloth.
  • If the particle cannot be removed after numerous attempts over some time, seek immediate medical attention.

 

Where is Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S)?
EH&S Building is located at the intersection of Pentland Way and Linden Street, next to the Transportation and Parking Services (TAPS) office.  Location Map

Do I need to schedule an appointment to get PPE?
Yes. The process takes approximately 15 minutes and includes selection of PPE, fitting of PPE, and customizing of PPE.  It is important that you book an appointment  so the necessary time is allotted for your visit.

What do I bring to my appointment?
Bring your PPE voucher and a form of ID.  We need to verify that we are outfitting the right person.

How do I obtain a voucher? 
Once you have acknowledged the hazard assessment and completed the PPE training video, you will be able to download the voucher. Bring a hard-copy of your voucher to your scheduled PPE appointment.

Who completes the hazard assessment? 
Your PI completes the laboratory hazard assessment, and you will review and acknowledge it.

Can I pick up PPE for myself and a fellow lab member?
No, only the individual who scheduled an appointment can collect their own PPE. The fitting component is requisite for PPE therefore proxies are not acceptable.

How can I get my lab coat laundered?
The campus storehouse offers laundering services for a nominal fee when an FAU number is provided. Visit the Request Lab Coat Laundering website or contact storehouse staff (x:2-5542) to learn more.

I'm having issues with Risk and Safety Solutions suite (such as LHAT). How do I clear my browser cache?
Clearing your browser cache will resolve most issues when using the UC Safety suite of applications. Follow the instructions below for your preferred browser.:

  • Mozilla Firefox: Open the browser and click on the three horizontal lines near the top right of the window and click "Options". In the box that pops up, click on the "Advanced" tab. Within "Advanced" find the "Network" tab in the middle. There is a section that says "Cached Web Content". Click the "Clear now" box next to it.
  • Google Chrome: Open the browser and click on the three horizontal lines near the top right of the window and click "Settings". Scroll down and near the bottom, click "Show advanced Settings". In the "Privacy" section, click the button that says "Clear browsing data". In the drop down menu, choose "the last four weeks" and only check the "Cookies and other site and plug-in d
  • Internet Explorer: Open the browser and click the gear icon near the top right of the window and choose "Internet options". In the "General" tab, find the "Browsing history" section and click "Delete". Check the boxes for "Temporary Internet files and w